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Funeral Etiquette: What’s legal, what’s disrespectful

Sunday, December 16, 2018

Most of us at some point in our lives have encountered a funeral procession as either part of the funeral or as a passerby in traffic. Either way, most states have laws regarding both situations.

 

According to the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 2011 RS §32:300.3 a funeral procession is two or more vehicles accompanying the deceased person or cremated human remains during daylight hours.

 

If you are not part of the funeral procession you are required by law to yield the right-of-way to each vehicle that is participating in the procession unless you are operating an authorized emergency vehicle with both lights and sirens on.

 

If you are traveling in the right lane of a divided highway, a multiple-lane highway or an interstate and you come upon a funeral procession you are not required to yield the right-of-way.

 

If you are part of the funeral procession you are required to have your headlights on and your emergency hazards flashing.

 

Vehicles that are participating in the procession are not permitted to leave the procession unless directed to do so by a law enforcement officer. If you do leave the procession, you are not permitted to re-join it.

 

If the funeral procession has a police escort, whenever the lead vehicle of the procession enters an intersection, the remaining vehicles in the procession may continue to follow through the intersection ignoring any traffic signals.

The majority of passersby who encounter a funeral procession will pull over to the side of the road and give the procession the right-of-way and wait until they completely pass as a sign of respect for the deceased.

 

But there are those who do not. Maybe they do so because they are in a rush to get somewhere, they are not sure what to do or it’s not their culture.

Whatever the reason we all know that a funeral procession is a very sad and emotional time for the family.

 

Why don’t we all show the utmost respect for the deceased and pull over for the extra few minutes it might take for them to pass you by. After all, it will be your family and friends carrying you to your final resting place one day and you wouldn’t want to endure any such disrespect.

 

So now you know...this post was originally published by Leesvilledailyleader

 

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